Official The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue characters

The Secret of Nimh characters

Mrs. Brisby is a widowed field mouse who lives on the Fitzgibbons' farm.  We never do learn her first name (though she certainly has one).  Unlike her husband, Jonathan, she is not a member of the group of mice who were being experimented on at NIMH.  She is, in fact, a wild field mouse, and so does not enjoy the benefits granted to the mice and the rats of NIMH via the injections they were subjected to (including the prolonged life span; the various benefits have also likely been passed on to her four children, Martin, Teresa, Timothy, and Cynthia).  However, she's not a mouse to be underestimated.  Mrs. Brisby demonstrates a remarkable capacity for learning, and even has learned (thanks to her late husband) how to read some things.  She's also a doting mother, who cares very deeply for her children.  She also has a meek and shy personality, though in a pinch she can muster up a startling amount of courage for the benefit of those whom she cares about...even at the risk of her own life.

Quote: "How is it that everyone kn-kn-knows Jonathan?"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Mrs. Frisby is essentially the very same character we see in the movie.  Beyond a name change, there are no differences to speak of.  She is described in the book in this manner: "although she was a widow (her husband had died only the preceding summer), Mrs. Frisby was able, through luck and hard work, to keep her family--there were four children--happy and well fed."


In the animated sequel: In the sequel, we don't see or hear that much of Mrs. Brisby.  It's been a few years, and she's definitely showing signs of rapid aging.  The fur around her face and on her head is graying, and she's wearing bifocal glasses.  We see her send her son Timothy off to Thorn Valley for instruction and also grooming to step into his father's footsteps.  But after that, we do not see her again until the closing scenes of the movie, and her role is relegated to simply basking in the celebration of her son's successes.  The heroic mother mouse, protagonist of the first movie, is now just a senior citizen relegated to the fringes of the NIMH legacy.

Mrs. Brisby in NIMH 2
 



Voice actor : Elizabeth Hartman, Debi Mae West (sequel)



Little did the rats of NIMH realize that not only had the mice, whom they had presumed lost and killed during the escape from NIMH, had survived, but that they might have had children of their own.  But it did happen.  And in the sequel one of them, brave and brash young Jenny McBride, is discovered by Timothy Brisby during a nightly foraging expedition.  Jenny is the daughter of two of the original group of mice which were experimented on by NIMH, and injected with the serum which changed their DNA, making them smarter and longer-lived.  Her parents, Troy McBride and Helen McBride, still confined at NIMH, long for a rescue...and Jenny sets out to try and make that happen.  She learned of Thorn Valley's existence from another mouse, who was captured and brought to NIMH while she was there.  So she took it upon herself to set out and find Thorn Valley, and ask the rats to mount a rescue.

Quote: "You've got to have the courage to follow your heart."


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", the number of mice who are confined at NIMH is eight.  During the escape, six are swept into the ventilation system and lost.  Though their fates are never firmly established.  Only Jonathan Brisby and Mr. Ages manage to make it out of NIMH with the rats.  The other mice then, during the animated sequel, are frequently referred to as "The Lost Six".  Jenny McBride is the daughter of two of them (as noted above).


In the animated sequel: Jenny McBride is a young, attractive teenaged mouse girl, about the same age as Timothy (approximately 17 in human years).  While she has her own destiny and purpose in the story, that of seeking the rats of NIMH to convince them to help mount a rescue of her parents and the rest of "The Lost Six" mice from the original escape from NIMH, she also becomes Timothy's friend and compatriot.  Ultimately, the two young mice fall in love!



Voice actor : Hynden Walch



Justin may be the Captain of the Guard for the rats of NIMH, but don't let the title fool you; he's not just a soldier.  He's a rat of impeccable character...kind, noble and friendly.  And yet he's also a skilled leader who has proven himself time and again to Nicodemus and the other rats, and is held in high regard as a result.  And, when necessary, he's pretty handy with a sword!  When Nicodemus meets an untimely end at the hands of Jenner's schemes, it is Justin who rises to the leadership of the rats of NIMH.

Quote: "We tend to take ourselves a little too seriously."


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Justin is pretty much the same character we see in the movie (mostly).  He is described, when Mrs. Frisby first meets him as "...alert, dark gray in color, and extraordinarily handsome, though not so huge as Brutus."  Justin is never officially given the title he has in the movie; though, in the book, Nicodemus does admit to Mrs. Frisby that "...indeed, you might call Justin the captain of the guard--if we had any such titles, but we don't."  Justin is definitely, on the other hand, an influential and important member of the rats of NIMH.  In the book, it is both he and Jenner who initially figure out the means of freeing the rats and finding an escape route out of the NIMH laboratory.  In fact, it is Justin who first begins looking for it, which is what brings him to Nicodemus' attention in the first place.  In the book, as much as in the movies, he is a noble and honorable character.


In the animated sequel: There really aren't any changes to this character worth mentioning in the animated sequel.  Not only is he pretty much the same, indeed he hardly seems to have aged at all.  But while he has definitely maintained the leadership of the Thorn Valley colony, it's also evident that he shares many leadership roles, in the sequel, with Mr. Ages, who has apparently decided to move into the colony from his previous home on the Fitzgibbons farm.

Justin in NIMH 2



Voice actor : Peter Strauss, William H. Macy (sequel)



Brutus is a hulking rat who serves as a guard at the entrance to the rats of NIMH colony, established within (and under) the rose bush on the Fitzgibbons farm.  He's the strong, silent type in the first movie, never uttering a word, but presenting a very intimidating and ominous presence before the entrance to the colony.  He carries a large, elaborately-bladed halberd which somehow manages to shed an electric charge when it strikes anything solid.  And while he's a formidable presence, effectively frightening Mrs. Brisby nearly out of her wits, he clearly doesn't mean her any real harm, but is satisfied in just trying to scare her away.

Quote (from the sequel): "Yo!  What in the name of Nicodemus?!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Brutus is a more active character than in the movie.  And he's rather more talkative.  While he holds no weapon on guard in the book, he is described briefly as Mrs. Frisby stumbles upon him: "beside the entranceway, looking at her with dark, unblinking eyes, stood the biggest rat she had ever seen."  Brutus doesn't frighten her or chase her off, but he does bluntly and rudely order her to go, under threat of being carried out.

We learn, however, that he's got a heroic side to him.  Near the end, when the rats are leaving for Thorn Valley, ten of them (including Brutus and Justin) stay behind to try and mislead the NIMH scientists, and make them believe that they are just ordinary rats.  When the scientists flood the colony (which has been disassembled and made to look like a normal rat nest) with cyanide gas, the rats flee and get away.  Brutus, the last to leave, stumbles out of an escape hole and collapses, apparently overcome by the gas.


In the animated sequel: When we next see Brutus, in the movie sequel, he has gone through a significant redesign by the artists and animators, and also has a voice actor (and an active role in the movie).  Brutus is still a big, strong and heroic rat, and now he appears to serve the rats of NIMH in relatively the same fashion as Justin did in the first movie.  And while he's not the brighest bulb in the box, he's got a good heart and is absolutely fearless.  He takes good care of young Timothy Brisby during the adventures they have together.  Below we see Brutus and young Timothy Brisby in the midst of an adventure.


 



Voice actor : Kevin Michael Richardson (sequel)



Martin Brisby is a brash and bold young mouse, the oldest son of Jonathan Brisby and Mrs. Brisby.  Since his father's death, Martin has worked hard to assume the "man of the house" (mouse of the house?) role for the family.  But his impulsiveness and youthful bravado keep getting in the way.  Still, he's got a good heart, and cares very deeply for his mother and his siblings...though he's not too terribly fond of, or patient with, Auntie Shrew!

QUOTE: "I'm not afraid of the dark...I'm not afraid of the farmer...I'm not even scared of Dragon!  I'm not even afraid of...of...of the Great Owl!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Martin is rather different than he is in the movies.  He's described as "the biggest, a strong, quick mouse, dark-haired and handsome like his poor father."  Martin does not display any of the brash and impulsive nature he has in the first movie, nor the emotionally-conflicted nature he has in the sequel.


In the animated sequel: A few years along and, as the action in the movie opens, Martin is a bit older (approximately the equivalent of 12 human years), and a bit more sensible.  However, he's also frustrated and emotionally-conflicted, as he has been told that, even as the oldest son of Jonathan Brisby, he's not going to be the one to go to Thorn Valley to be a hero-in-training and fulfill a prophecy, but that it will be his younger brother Timothy.  Martin is rather bitter about this and, while he loves and looks after his brother, he's nursing a grudge.  He also goes through a bit of a change in the sequel--his eyes go from brown to green, and his fur from light brown to light gray.  He changes substantially into an evil character during the movie (for which there is a separate entry in the character list), but at the end the rats of NIMH, and Mr. Ages, manage to restore him to his old self, though now a bit older (approximately 19 human years).

Martin Brisby in NIMH 2













 



Voice actor : Wil Wheaton, Phillip Van Dyke (sequel), Phillip Glasser (sequel)



Jeremy is a young crow with the social (not to mention physical) grace and style of a three-legged mule.  He epitomizes the archetype of a character who means well, but can't seem to get his act together.  Between collecting string, pursuing sparklies, and looking for Ms. Right, he's always ready to help the Brisby family out of a jam - as soon as he can get untangled from his string collection, that is.

Quote: "Excuse me, pardon me..."


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Jeremy differs slightly from the character we see in the movie.  While he is still a young crow fascinated, even obsessed, with the collection of things (especially shiny things), he's not a bumbling goofball.  This aspect of the character was added as the character was developed for the movie, and primarily with the input of his voice actor, comedian Dom DeLuise.  The actor brought a great deal to the character, and helped define him in a way that has cemented his popularity with NIMH fans.  In the book, while Jeremy is still a helpful and well-meaning--if naïve--young fellow, who definitely is out to impress a young lady friend (one he already has met...so he's not quite the hopeless romantic that he is in the movie), colorful string is not his particular obsession.  The first time we meet him, he's discovered by Mrs. Frisby with his foot caught in a piece of silvery Christmas tinsel which had attracted his attention...which also leads to the encounter with Dragon.


In the animated sequel: After a few years, it's clear that Jeremy has become a little older, just a tad wiser and, unfortunately, a bit more boring.  We see no evidence that his encounter with Miss Right, at the end of the first movie, has produced any lasting benefits (or offspring).  And, later in the sequel, he actually takes up with a crooked con-man of a caterpillar in an attempt to bilk the animals of the forest out of their belongings, and to bring "sparklies" as tribute to him so the two of them could make it rich.  That is, until an older Timothy Brisby, and his girlfriend Jenny McBride, happen along and have a hand in unraveling the on-going scheme, which sets Jeremy back on the right path.

Jeremy NIMH 2



Voice actor : Dom DeLuise



One of only two mice to successfully escape from the NIMH laboratory, Mr. Ages developed a talent for chemistry, medical sciences and biology, and has used these skills, and his great knowledge, as a physician for the wild animals living on and near the Fitzgibbons farm.  Known for his crusty, acerbic and superstitious nature, he prefers to keep to himself and be left alone, living on the fringes of the Fitzgibbons farm in an old (and not entirely deactivated) hay baler.  He makes frequent visits, however, to the rose bush and the colony established by the rats of NIMH, and serves there as a senior and influential member of the community.  Despite his personality quirks (and his often harsh opinions of others), he is very fond of the Brisby family, and is completely dedicated to the rats of NIMH.

Quote: "Madam, that is an emergency!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Mr. Ages is not quite the acerbic old fusspot he is in the movie (though he is older than the other mice, and many of the rats).  He is not described in much detail in the book: "His fur was a soft gray-white, and so glossy he seemed almost to glow.  Mrs. Frisby had heard that Mr. Ages was not truly a white mouse; that is, he had not been born with white fur, but had turned white from old age.  Whether this was so or not she did not know.  Certainly he seemed very old, and very wise; yet he walked nimbly enough."

In the book, Mr. Ages' living quarters (and his private laboratory) are also quite different than in the movie.  Mr. Ages is said to live in the corner of the brick foundation of an old, burnt-down farmhouse.  As described in the book, Mr. Ages’ house was “a hole in the brick wall where one end of heavy floor beam had once rested.  It was about two feet below the top of the wall, and one reached it by climbing down a sort of rough stairway of broken brick ends…”, with a door “…made of a piece of shingle”, with a “…narrow ledge of brick in front of [the] door”.  The house, “…somewhat larger than a shoebox but about the same shape, resembled the house of a hermit.  It was bare of furniture except for a bit of bedding in one corner, a stool made of a piece of brick, and another piece of brick worn smooth from use as a pestle on which he ground out medicines.  Along one entire wall, arranged neatly in small piles, stood the raw materials he had collected: roots, seeds, dried leaves, pods, strips of bark and shriveled mushrooms.”


In the animated sequel: In the sequel, Mr. Ages plays an active role in the Thorn Valley community, almost as a co-leader with Justin.  He's even seen in their council chamber in the primary seat of authority.  We also see him cataloging local flora and fauna, as well as tutoring and advising young Timothy Brisby.  It seems that, in the sequel, Mr. Ages has picked up and left his home in the old hay baler and moved permanently into the Thorn Valley community, along with all of his laboratory equipment.  Apart from that, and the fact that he appears to have lost a lot of his endearing personality quirks (at least in how he is presented in this sequel), there are no changes to the character whatsoever.



Voice actor : Arthur Malet



Timothy ("Timmy") Brisby is the third of Mrs. Brisby's four children.  In the movie, he is introduced to us as the cause for Mrs. Brisby's adventures, in that he is seriously ill.  When Mrs. Brisby pays a visit to Mr. Ages, seeking medicine and advice on her son's illness, he tells her that Timothy has pneumonia, and that he cannot go outside for three weeks.  Unfortunately, the family was getting ready to move out of their winter home, in farmer Fitzgibbons' field, in preparation for his plowing it for planting.  She must find a way to either stop the tractor from plowing the field (which could destroy her home and kill her son) or safely move her son and/or her home out of the reach of the tractor. 

Timothy is relegated, otherwise, to a very minor role in this movie, other than being the protagonist's primary motivation.  We see him occasionally in the early parts of the movie, sick in bed, but we don't actually see him interact with his family until the end, as he begins to show signs of improvement.  And indeed, he and the Brisby home are saved, and he does get better, thanks to the ingenuity of the rats of NIMH, Mr. Ages' medicine, Timmy's caring family, and a touch of magic.

Quote (from the sequel): "Tag-along Timmy...that's all I'm ever gonna be!  I'm never gonna see any real action!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Timothy's illness carries all the weight it does in the first movie.  And he is described in greater detail than any of the other Frisby children: "he was the thinnest of her children and had a dark complexion like his father and brother.  He was narrow of face; his eyes were unusually large and bright, and shone with the intensity of his thought when he spoke.  He was, Mrs Frisby knew, the smartest and most thoughtful of her children, though she would never have admitted this aloud.  Be he was also the frailest, and when colds or flu or virus infections came around he was the first to catch them and the slowest to recover.  He was also--perhaps as a result--something of a hypochondriac.  But there was no doubt he was really sick this time."

Of course, in the book, Timothy talks much more with his family, and is up and around a bit more, rather than being totally bed-ridden like in the movie.


In the animated sequel: Unlike the very minor role Timothy plays in the first movie, he is the protagonist in the sequel, and really shines in it (considering the otherwise mediocre and sometimes even poor quality of the story, the animation and the acting).  We see Timothy at three different stages of his life in this sequel: first, as a young boy mouse about ten human years old (played by Andrew Ducote).  He's a shy boy, but playful, and deeply bonded with his older brother Martin, whom he looks up to. 

When he is sent (somewhat reluctantly at first) to Thorn Valley to begin tutelage and training (with the idea of stepping into his father's footsteps and also fulfilling a "prophecy" about him), we see his maturation at two points.  The first is when he is the equivalent of a thirteen year old boy (played by Alex Strange), and then finally at the equivalent of a seventeen year old teenager (played by Ralph Macchio).  Timothy is having a hard time learning how to live up to his father's legacy, and is a little bitter at not only not having his father around to learn from, but also about being treated as a not-so-ready-for-heroism "Johnny-come-lately"...most especially by the leader of the rats, and one of his tutors, Justin.  As a thirteen year old, he's begun to take his training very seriously...and the playful young boy mouse seems gone forever.  But then, as a teenaged mouse, Timothy begins to demonstrate a bit of maturity and good humor.  While he's still frustrated about what duties and responsibilities he's given, he finally gets the chance to save the day (and his brother), gets a spot on his father's statue, and he even gets the girl!

However, his story of his bond with his brother, as well as his maturation and filling of his father's shoes, is handled very well, and the actors who give voice to him do a fantastic job with the character, which is one of the few bright spots in an otherwise disappointing movie.  Even the attention paid to drawing the character is better than some of the other character artwork in this sequel.

<b>Timothy Brisby</b> in NIMH 2



Voice actor : Ian Fried, Andrew Ducote (sequel), Alex Strange (sequel), Ralph Macchio (sequel)



Cecil is a con-man in caterpillar's clothing.  He has teamed up with a temporarily misguided Jeremy in a scheme to convince all the animals of the forest to bring them "sparklies"...gems, jewelry, etc.  Cecil has done this by convincing Jeremy to disguise himself as the Great Owl, and to pull of an act that they hope will convince the forest animals that it is in their best interests to keep bringing them tribute.  It's a low point for Jeremy, but Cecil's making the most of it, and has quite a flair for misdirection, double-talk, snarky jibes and the art of the con.  He's one slippery bug!  And yet, underneath that dishonest exterior is a good heart, and Cecil does eventually get the chance to prove it.

Quote: "So what are you waiting for?  Applause?  A candygram maybe?"


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  He is seen solely in the sequel.



Voice actor : Meshach Taylor



At some unspecified point during the events of The Secret of NIMH 2, Timothy's older brother, Martin, ends up in the clutches of NIMH...having either been captured by Dr. Valentine, or having attempted to play the hero (out of an apparent jealousy of his younger brother).  As part of Dr. Valentine's hairbrained schemes, he has been altering animals through abusive electro-shock applications.  Until one day, during an careless moment, a gradually transformed Martin gets the drop on Dr. Valentine, and slips an electro shock device on his head, and shocks him.  This is the beginning of Martin's transformation into evil, and his increasing addiction to electro shock.  He takes over NIMH, forcing all of the human staff members to think they're dogs, and turning the other animals trapped at NIMH into a private army, for his plans to eventually march on and take over Thorn Valley.  All but "The Lost Six", the remaining mice who were thought, by Nicodemus and the rats of NIMH, to have perished in the air shafts of the NIMH ventilation system during the original escape. 

Evil Martin is a megalomaniac, bent on conquering Thorn Valley and making Jenny McBride his queen.  And he's apparently lost all brotherly love for Timothy.  The question is whether or not Timothy can save him and if the rats of NIMH can restore him to his old self.

Quote: "I suppose I have changed a bit...but for the better!"


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  He is seen solely in the sequel.  This is perhaps one of the most blatant examples, in the misuse of an existing and beloved character from the book and the first movie, of how the sequel fails on so many levels.  And yet, in spite of it, this bizarre character corruption provides the impetus for some heroism on the party of Timothy, motivated by his filial love for his brother, and a desire to see him restored to normal.



Voice actor : Eric Idle



Floyd is a real flea bag of an alley cat, with a lazy eye and a nicked ear.  He's got a coat that appears as a brownish-greenish-gray, with some unusual markings on it.  And he has one red eye (his lazy one) and one blue eye.  Like his friend Muriel (another alley cat), he makes his living by scrounging through the city trash cans and dumpsters, searching for anything which could even approximate a meal.  He survives Muriel's domination over him by sweet talking her with pet names like "snookums" and "my little nightingale".  But he's a sucker for a free handout...even if it ends up getting him captured by Dr. Valentine, and exposed to the electro shock applications which, in the end, make him an evil minion of Evil Martin.  (Note the post-transformation effects in the screen shot below).

Quote: "Wait up, snookums!"  (as Evil Floyd: "I say!  I've caught a mouse!")


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  He is seen solely in the sequel.

Floyd after his electro shock transformation:

Floyd evil



Voice actor : Harvey Korman



Muriel is a chunky alley cat, who enjoys spending her evenings up on a fence caterwauling...so badly that it could stop a clock.  She hangs out with Floyd, another alley cat who is as much her step-and-fetch-it as he is her companion.  Muriel certainly has no reservations about reminding Floyd of his subservience to her whenever the situation calls for it.  Still, like her buddy Floyd, she's a sucker for a free handout...even if it ends up getting her captured by Dr. Valentine, and exposed to the electro shock applications which, in the end, make her an evil minion of Evil Martin.  (Note the post-transformation effects in the screen shot below).

Quote: "O solo meow!"  (as Evil Muriel: "Oh I'm so sorry.  Did I startle you?")


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  She is seen solely in the sequel.

Muriel after her electro shock transformation:

Evil Muriel



Voice actor : Andrea Martin



A shrew by nature as well as species, Auntie Shrew is a character of mixed traits. Although she may be a bit of a busybody and has a somewhat over-inflated sense of her own importance, she means well deep down.  While she may also be an opinionated, supicious, stubborn and acerbic old fussbudget, she can also be very brave if the situation calls for it.

Frequently called upon by Mrs. Brisby, Auntie Shrew is as dedicated as a nanny as she is as the "town crier" for the animal residents of the Fitzgibbons field. The Brisby children (Martin in particular) do not hold her in quite as high regard as she probably deserves (or expects), although Teresa and Cynthia, at least, show her some respect when she's around.

Quote: "Why me?  That I alone should be responsible for the welfare of the entire field is monstrous!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", this character is only ever called "the shrew", not "Auntie Shrew" or "Auntie".  She's also not quite the acerbic fussbudget that she is in The Secret of NIMH, but she still has very strong opinions, and considers herself responsible for the welfare (and the news) of the field.  Described in the book as having "a wit as sharp as her teeth", she uses both to good effect.  Near the end of the story, as the rats of NIMH are preparing to move the Frisby family home, the shrew actually holds them at bay, and bites one of the rats on the leg!  It takes Mrs. Frisby's timely intervention to convince her that the rats are not there to steal anything from her home or cause any other kind of trouble.


In the animated sequel: It's a few years since the events of the first movie, and all the characters have aged.  On some of them, like Auntie Shrew, it shows.  She has a much smaller role in the sequel, and has lost much of that crusty fussiness which endeared her to so many fans.

Auntie Shrew (older)



Voice actor : Hermione Baddeley, Doris Roberts (sequel)



Teresa is the oldest of Mrs. Brisby's four children, and the most well-behaved and courteous of the bunch.  She takes it upon herself, quite often, to assist her mother in looking after the household and the family and, unlike her more brash younger brother, Martin, prefers to stay out of trouble (though she certainly doesn't mind pointing a tattling finger at him when he causes trouble).  She likes to wear a large pink ribbon in her hair, and carries herself in a very demure, lady-like fashion.

Quote: "Mother, did the rats really go to Thorn Valley?"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", it's firmly established that Teresa is the oldest of the four children (though it is not so in the movie).  There really is no description of her in the book beyond that.  And she is not really all that different from the movie version of the character.


In the animated sequel: As with her younger sister, Cynthia, Teresa is only seen briefly in the animated sequel - early in the movie, and then again at the end.  And like Cynthia, she has no major part to play in the movie other than making some observations.  Although she appears to have grown up...being a young teenager in the beginning and, by the end, a young adult.  She is seen in the screen shot below, from the sequel, with Cynthia (center) and Martin (at right):


 



Voice actor : Shannen Doherty, Jamie Cronin (sequel)



Charming and unobtrusive, Cynthia is the youngest of the Brisby children. Apparently the most innocent and naïve of the bunch, she enjoys Auntie Shrew's visits and could be said to be the least trouble-prone of the four Brisby bunch.  With a tendency to be overlooked, she is rather fidgety - a trait which Auntie Shrew maintains is much like her mother's.

Quote: "Oh the poor turkey fell down!"


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", Cynthia is a bit more talkative (and better with words) than in the movie.  She is described as "a slim, pretty girl-mouse, light haired and, in fact, light-headed as well, and over-fond of dancing."


In the animated sequel: In this movie she, like her older sister Teresa, has even a smaller part to play than she did in the first movie.  She's a few years older, and appears to have put on some weight too, as seen in this screen shot of three of the Brisby children (L-R: Teresa, Cynthia and Martin):


 



Voice actor : Jodi Hicks, Whitney Claire Kaufman (sequel)



Dr. Valentine is a chief researcher at NIMH, and has come to the Fitzgibbons' farm to search, in and around it, for any of the escaped rats.  He's brought one of his assistants with him, and they're both determined to find and capture as many rats as possible.  Dr. Valentine is a sinister fellow, with sunken eyes and a cold demeanor.


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  He is seen solely in the sequel.  In the book, the chief NIMH researcher is a Dr. Schultz who, while a bit on the cold and scientific side, is not at all like the cartoonish Dr. Valentine, and not nearly as cruel or inept.



Voice actor : Steve Mackall



This toady is an assistant of Dr. Valentine (from NIMH), who has joined him on the Fitzgibbons' farm, and in the surrounding countryside, laying traps and hunting for any of the escaped rats from NIMH.  There are sinister plans for the rats if and when they are caught, and this fellow is utterly determined to do whatever it takes to capture the escaped rats, and impress Dr. Valentine.  His facial features are constantly twisted in an evil countenance, and he has a raspy, snivelly voice.  He's not a nice guy!


Origins of the character: This character does not appear in Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", or in the original The Secret of NIMH.  He is seen solely in the sequel.  In the book, there are two assistant researchers who work with Dr. Schultz, but these are much more realistic and humane characters.  One is a young man named George, the other a young woman named Julie (who actually expresses sympathy for the rats and mice during their research on them). 

On the other hand, this character is everything but humane, and not really very realistic.  And we never learn his name.



Voice actor : (Uncredited)



Troy McBride is the aged father of Jenny McBride, and husband of Helen McBride.  He and his wife are two of "The Lost Six", the mice who never made it out of NIMH and, as presumed by Nicodemus and the rats of NIMH, were "swept down dark air shafts to their deaths".  They were recaptured by the NIMH scientists (including Dr. Valentine) after making it down into the basement.  And then they were subsequently returned to their cage.  And they still long for a rescue...pining away in utter sadness.


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", the number of mice who are confined at NIMH is eight.  During the escape, six are swept into the ventilation system and lost.  Though their fates are never firmly established.  Only Jonathan Brisby and Mr. Ages manage to make it out of NIMH with the rats.  The other mice then, during the animated sequel, are frequently referred to as "The Lost Six".



Voice actor : Jameson Parker



Helen McBride is the meek, soft-spoken and aged mother of Jenny McBride, and the wife of Troy McBride.  She and her husband are two of "The Lost Six", the mice who never made it out of NIMH and, as presumed by Nicodemus and the rats of NIMH, were "swept down dark air shafts to their deaths".  They were recaptured by the NIMH scientists (including Dr. Valentine) after making it down into the basement.  And then they were subsequently returned to their cage.  And they still long for a rescue...pining away in utter sadness.


Origins of the character: In Robert C. O'Brien's book "Mrs. Frisby And The Rats Of NIMH", the number of mice who are confined at NIMH is eight.  During the escape, six are swept into the ventilation system and lost.  Though their fates are never firmly established.  Only Jonathan Brisby and Mr. Ages manage to make it out of NIMH with the rats.  The other mice then, during the animated sequel, are frequently referred to as "The Lost Six".



Voice actor : Darleen Carr



7991 visits

Last comments


No member comments yet




Go to The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue overview   The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue overview


The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue DVD  Go to The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue DVD

Not connected : To be able to post a message site, you must be connected.

Register on the site!

The Secret of Nimh reads and more


Site activity




Franšais   English

RSS      Bookmark the site      Privacy policy      15 visitors connected

Generated in 0.217 seconds

To give you the best experience, this site uses cookies. By continuing, you're giving consent to cookies being used. Learn more... Close X