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 Post subject: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:48 pm 
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Greetings, fellow fan fiction writers! Well, we've seen many subjects on the question of crafting good fan fiction, and I shan't rehash those. They stand on their own as good material. What I want to tackle is the question of how to write a good crossover fan fiction--the combining of two fictional milieus (such as two animated movie settings or groups of characters) into one storyline.

We've seen many of these on Animation Source. A few of them are pretty darned good...some are fair...but a substantial amount are really poor. Part of that comes down to simple writing skills (or lack thereof) of their authors. Other times it is a matter of combining two milieus which are incompatible. "Then what", you ask, "makes a good crossover?" That is what this topic is going to broach.

This is going to be a long, wordy topic. You have been forewarned. But if you are serious about tackling crossover fan fiction writing, or about improving on previous works you've done of this sort, then I recommend reading on and digesting what I've placed here. Please note: I am not suggesting or implying that I am the be-all, end-all, know-it-all of fan fiction writing. NO ONE is. But I've done this sort of thing before, and have already been through school and college, and had a lot of classes on literature, creative writing, grammar, etc. And I think I have a pretty good handle on this sort of thing.

You are welcome to peruse my existing crossover fan fiction, a work in progress (two of three parts of the storyline have been completed, and were very well received here on Animation Source over the last couple of years)...the continuing story Nome Meets Snob Hill, a Balto/Lady and the Tramp crossover: http://www.animationsource.org/balto/en/view_fanfic/Nome_Meets_Snob_Hill_Part_1/52091.html, http://www.animationsource.org/balto/en/view_fanfic/Nome_Meets_Snob_Hill_Part_2/51618.html.

(Those fan fictions I wrote, of course, are very old by now, and are due for updates. I plan to re-write them soon, and improve upon the material. So please keep that in mind if and when you read them! lol)



WRAPPING YOUR HEAD AROUND THE CONCEPT, PART ONE
Before we delve into what makes a good crossover, let's consider what makes a bad crossover. When we consider the many animated movies we could draw upon to create a crossover story, and the inexhaustible material not part of Animation Source (other animated movies or television series, other literary stories, etc.), we admittedly have a mountain of inspiration and material at our beck and call. It is tempting to create a story based upon things we happen to personally like. The question is, should certain things we happen to like be combined into a story simply to suit our own personal tastes?

A selfish person would answer "why not?" to that question. "Hey", they'd contend, "it's my story. If you don't like it, you don't have to read it". That doesn't negate the possible flaw of combining two or more things which, to a rational mind, might not be plausibly combined. A good writer writes not just for him or herself, but to reach an audience. This implies that the writer cares about what his or her readers think and feel. Not just what matters to him or her (at the risk of appearing sexist, which is not my intent, from this point forward, I am only going to use the masculine.. I don't mean to be insensitive or sexist. I am just trying to keep things simple and save a little space). Here's a harsh lesson many of you need to learn: it's not supposed to be all about you. If you really don't care about what your readers (or potential readers) might think, and are not trying to reach them, or even touch them emotionally, then you really have no business whatsoever posting your material online for others to see, because the only person you are trying to please is yourself (and, perhaps, anyone who thinks and feels exactly like you do). And that's no reason to be writing literature.

I would like you to consider the following quotation. This is taken from a memorandum written by the late actor Robert Reed (whom you will all know best as the father in the original Brady Bunch television series). Robert Reed was a classically-trained actor, who was used to doing things like Shakespeare. Whatever got him into doing situation-comedy on television is anyone's guess, but his battles with the show's creators and writers were the stuff of legend. In this particular instance, in what would become the very last episode of the series, Reed was furious with the script, which he felt broke from the earlier standards of the show into something farcical, and he refused to take part. When the creators threatened to fire him, he stood firm, even showing up on the sets every day scowling and watching off-camera. The creators refused to have him escorted off-studio, for fears the kid actors wouldn't understand, and that it would affect their performances. So they tried to negotiate with Reed in the usual industry fashion. Here is what resulted. Now, this is only a part of the entire memo that Reed sent to them, and only the part which is relevant to this topic.

As you read it, consider what I have been trying to say about what constitutes good versus bad, and the importance of keeping plausibility in the form you've chosen. "Plausibility" is going to become a very important concept in this topic, and I will go into it in detail in an upcoming post. But for now, please read. This memo has become legendary...not only among Brady Bunch fans, but also in Hollywood itself (keep in mind that this was written in the early 1970s...and some material he covers in this memo is dated to that time period):

"To Sherwood Schwartz et al.

Notes: Robert Reed

There is a fundamental difference in theatre between:

1.Melodrama
2.Drama
3.Comedy
4.Farce
5.Slapstick
6.Satire &
7.Fantasy

They require not only a difference in terms of construction, but also in presentation and, most explicitly, styles of acting. Their dramatis peronsae are noninterchangable. For example, Hamlet, archtypical of the dramatic character, could not be written into Midsummer Night's Dream and still retain his identity. Ophelia could not play a scene with Titania; Richard II could not be found in Twelfth Night. In other words, a character indigenous to one style of the theatre cannot function in any of the other styles. Obviously, the precept holds true for any period. Andy Hardy could not suddenly appear in Citizen Kane, or even closer in style, Andy Hardy could not appear in a Laurel and Hardy film. Andy Hardy is a 'comedic' character, Laurel and Hardy are of the purest slapstick. The boundaries are rigid, and within the confines of one theatric piece the style must remain constant.

Why? It is a long since proven theorem in the theatre that an audience will adjust its suspension of belief to the degree that the opening of the presentation leads them. When a curtain rises on two French maids in a farce set discussing the peccadilloes of their master, the audience is now set for an evening of theatre in a certain style, and are prepared to accept having excluded certain levels of reality. And that is the price difference in the styles of theatre, both for the actor and the writer--the degree of reality inherent. Pure drama and comedy are closest to core realism, slapstick and fantasy the farthest removed. It is also part of that theorem that one cannot change styles midstream. How often do we read ***** critical reviews of, let's say, a drama in which a character has 'hammed' or in stricter terms become melodramatic. How often have we criticized the 'mumble and scratch' approach to Shakespearean melodrama, because ultra-realism is out of place when another style is required. And yet, any of these attacks could draw plaudits when played in the appropriate genre.

Television falls under exactly the same principle. What the networks in their oversimplification call 'sitcoms' actually are quite diverse styles except where ******* by careless writing or performing. For instance:

M*A*S*H....comedy
The Paul Lynde Show....Farce
Beverly Hillbillies.....Slapstick
Batman......Satire
I dream of Jeannie....Fantasy

And the same rules hold just as true. Imagine a scene in M*A*S*H in which Arthur Hill appears playing his 'Owen Marshall' role, or Archie Bunker suddenly landing on 'Gilligan's Island' , or Dom Deluise and his mother in 'Mannix.' Of course, any of these actors could play in any of the series in different roles predicated on the appropriate style of acting. But the maxim implicit in all this is: when the first-act curtain rises on a comedy, the second act curtain has to rise on the same thing, with the actors playing in commensurate styles.

If it isn't already clear, not only does the audience accept a certain level of belief, but so must the actor in order to function at all. His consciousness opens like an iris to allow the proper amount of reality into his acting subtext. And all of the actors in the same piece must deal with the same level, or the audience will not know to whom to adjust and will often empathize with the character with the most credibility--total reality eliciting the most complete empathic response. Example: We are in the operating room in M*A*S*H, with the usual pan shot across a myriad of operating tables filled with surgical teams at work. The leads are sweating away at their work, and at the same time engaged in banter with the head nurse. Suddenly, the doors fly open and Batman appears! Now the scene cannot go on. The M*A*S*H characters, dealing with their own level of quasi-comic reality, having subtext pertinent to the scene, cannot accept as real in their own terms this other character. Oh yes, they could make fast adjustments. He is a deranged member of some battle-fatigued platoon and somehow came upon a Batman suit. But the Batman character cannot then play his intended character true to his own series. Even if it were possible to mix both styles, it would have to be dealt with by the characters, not just abruptly accepted. Meanwhile, the audience will stick with that level of reality to which they have been introduced, and unless the added character quickly adjusts, will reject him."

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Last edited by BaltoSeppala on Thu Apr 23, 2015 9:12 am, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:49 pm 
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WRAPPING YOUR HEAD AROUND THE CONCEPT, PART TWO
Bad crossover writing basically amounts to what Robert Reed mentioned in that memorandum. It would be impossible for a sane person to take even a comedy show like M*A*S*H, for instance, seriously after seeing Batman swing through the doors of the unit's operating room. For one, the series is set in Korea during the 1950s, during the Korean War. Secondly, even though it is largely a situation comedy (sitcom), it is based upon historical concepts from our real world, and the real Korean War. Batman, on the other hand, is superhero fantasy. Even though it is at least possible for a Batman to exist in the real world (since the character has no superpowers, unlike most superheroes), no such character has ever existed in our real world. And Batman's setting was always a fictional version of New York City known as "Gotham City"...and while the character was created back in 1939, he was never shown participating in the Korean War in the 1950s, or visiting a MASH unit. It is therefore silly to combine the two and expect the audience to take it for granted simply because the writer might come back with "well, Batman existed before the Korean War, so he can suddenly appear in a MASH unit during that war!". A writer cannot shoehorn ANYTHING together just because he believes he can. There has to be a plausible reason for combining the two. Even combining fictional or even fantasy characters and settings, there must be a certain logic to it. A certain plausibility.

THE FOUNDATIONS OF A GOOD CROSSOVER
  • the characters from either setting must come from settings which could be combined without breaking the "suspension of belief" (as described by Robert Reed). Example: Balto could not visit New York City and the gang from Oliver & Company. The latter exist in the modern day, and Balto lived in the 1920s. He'd be long deceased by the setting of "Oliver & Company". It would violate the suspension of belief to combine the two just because the writer thought it'd be fun...or because he likes the two settings and the characters in them and therefore has some implied "right" to write whatever he wants.

  • there must be a way to get the characters together. Example: Sure, it's possible for the very anthropomorphized, humanized characters of TaleSpin and Cats Don't Dance to come together in a crossover story...as the two settings are fairly close in time period (TaleSpin set in the 1930s, and Cats Don't Dance appears to be set in the early to mid 1940s, during the "Golden Age" of Hollywood). But how? How would the cats get to Cape Suzette?

  • there must be a reason for the crossover. A good one. A plausible one. Let's take the previous example. Sure, Baloo and Kit could easily fly to Hollywood. But why? And for that matter, why would the cats from Cats Don't Dance need or want to get to Cape Suzette? What would their motivation be? And does it stay true to the characters as originally designed in both settings, and their personalities and motivations?

  • That question, of keeping true to the characters, their personalities and motivations, is also very important. For example: it's quite easy to imagine a crossover between, say, Fox And The Hound and Bambi. The two settings are nearly identical, and the characters practically interchangeable in many respects. But what reason would Bambi possibly have for spending any time with a fox, much less a hound dog who would probably want to bring him down for his master? He wouldn't. It wouldn't make sense. And no real deer would ever do such a thing. Buuuuut one could easily imagine Amos taking Copper and maybe even Chief out to hunt for deer, and the various characters getting intertwined as a result. It would work very easily. And could be very interesting. Even exciting!

Once you consider all of these factors, then you have to build a good and believable story. Yes, even in a fiction or a fantasy, you still need a good and believable story. Remember, your readers' belief can only be suspended if you don't break the foundations of good writing and plausibility. Batman popping into Sherwood Forest to save Maid Marian, while a hapless Robin looks on helplessly, would be patently ridiculous. And utterly farcical. Who needs it? And can you give your frustrated reader back his investment of time once he's read it and become upset over losing an hour of his life on some very bad writing? :lol:

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Last edited by BaltoSeppala on Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:06 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:50 pm 
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POSSIBLE CROSSOVER MILIEUS OF ANIMATION SOURCE
Based upon all I have said so far, and given the existing sources in the Animation Source list, let's take a look at some plausible and sensible crossover possibilities.

  • Balto/Lady and the Tramp - both milieus are set in the early 1900s. While they are set pretty far apart regionally (Balto and its sequels take place in Alaska, and Lady and the Tramp and its sequel take place in an unspecified small town in New England), we do know from history that the real Balto and his team traveled the U.S. accompanying a vaudeville tour. And that Balto was in New York City for the dedication of a monument to he and the sled teams. Even the first Balto movie establishes that concept for its own fictionalized version of the events. So Balto got around. It is plausible to imagine he and the team showing up in a small New England town during the vaudeville tour. Which is just what my Nome Meets Snob Hill storyline is all about!

  • Balto/The Princess and the Frog - Why in the world would this work? Consider the settings. For the same reason that the first crossover would...Balto is set in 1925 in Nome, Alaska, and The Princess and the Frog is set in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1926. You can't possibly get closer in time periods between two milieus, even despite the great distance between them geographically. And again, we could take into account Balto and his team touring the U.S. with the vaudeville show. Of course, there's a bit more to the magic in the Princess and the Frog setting than the simple tribal magic seen in Balto 2: Wolf Quest. And I'm not so sure how a writer would work this aspect out, but...

  • The Fox and the Hound/Bambi - Just as I stated in my previous post, these two milieus are made for each other: hunters, wild animals, hunting dogs, similar settings (forested country). And no hard limitations on the time period (though the automobiles used by Amos and Widow Tweed in The Fox and the Hound would presume a 1920s-30s time frame generally speaking). Story possibilities? They are endless!

  • Anastasia/Mulan - Okay...this is a bit of a stretch. But Russia and China are two countries which share a common (and very long) border. And I don't know for certain if there is a specific time period in which Mulan is set. Certainly we can presume that Anastasia is set sometime before the communist revolution in Russia, which took place, if memory serves, in 1917. The Chinese Civil War, which eventually brought about the Chinese communist revolution, began ten years after the Russian conflict. We can at least presume that events in Mulan take place before that time...as the events in Anastasia take place before 1917.

  • TaleSpin/Cats Don't Dance - As inferred in my previous post, these two milieus feature not only anthropomorphized animals, but anthropomorphized animals acting and dressing like humans (basically, they're no longer animals, but some sort of strange, implausible human/animal things). And their time frames are similar (TaleSpin, as mentioned on TaleSpin Source, is set in the 1930s. Cats Don't Dance has no specific time frame, but the setting appears to be that of the "Golden Age" of Hollywood, which ran from the late 1920s through the early 1960s. The architecture and other elements shown in the movie infer the 1940s or late 1930s). This, and the characteristics of the characters of both milieus, make crossover stories quite plausible.

  • Rio/Oliver & Company - Both are set in the modern period, though in very different parts of the world (Rio takes place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Oliver & Company takes place in New York City, in the U.S.). So there would have to be a very good reason to bring the two milieus together. But it is at least possible.

So why would the others not really work? I mean, consider the situations. The Lion King movies are set in the midst of the African savannah in a very unspecified time frame; The anthropomorphized/humanized characters in Robin Hood are right in theory for crossovers with either TaleSpin or Cats Don't Dance, but they exist in a medieval European setting and not early twentieth-century America.

So there are some working foundations for building good crossovers. And as other sources become active, new possibilities could present themselves. Discussion?

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Last edited by BaltoSeppala on Thu Oct 20, 2011 2:00 am, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 5:40 am 
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Okay, so, while I wait for what I hope will be some discussion on this topic (though I wonder if it will ever come at this point :? ) I would like to correct an oversight on my part regarding crossover possibilities on this site.

It would appear that Balto and Brother Bear would not work in a crossover setting, as someone informed me (and showed me screen shots) that there are mammoths in at least one of the Brother Bear movies. Now, I don't recall seeing mammoths in the first Brother Bear, but then, it has been a while since I've seen it. And I never saw the sequel. So I stand corrected. lol (Took out the mention of it in the last post...to avoid confusion.)

Interestingly, if there is ever an Ice Age source, it begs the question of whether or not a crossover between that and Brother Bear could work. lol The way I see it, it could.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 7:33 pm 
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This is a really well written topic! And you make a lot of good points here. It truly makes a good read for someone who's looking to write a cross-over.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:03 am 
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Well thanks! :D I hope it comes in handy if you should decide to attempt a crossover.

And thanks for bringing the topic back from the dead! Heh. I really appreciate that. I was beginning to wonder whether or not anyone cared...

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:40 pm 
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Nice topic.I think TLK is set in modern day,however,and I only think that since the Pridelands are a hot,dry area,no humans would ever want to visit there.


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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 3:36 pm 
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DogQuest wrote:
Nice topic.I think TLK is set in modern day,however,and I only think that since the Pridelands are a hot,dry area,no humans would ever want to visit there.

Actually, there is no indication from any of the material in the Lion King movies as to when they are set. However, the savannah of Africa is home to several native peoples...not the least of which include the Masai tribe (who have many run-ins with lions and other predators, to mention nothing of large herbivores, various reptiles, and even predatory insects). Heat and aridity are certainly no deterrents to humans populating certain areas.

But thanks for the compliment anyhoo. :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 1:14 am 
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I've managed to link Lion King with Balto. It wasn't easy, and I don't recommend it for everyone, even tho people already have.

Balto's great grand-daughter's master took a ship out there for studies I can't remember. She got separated from him in the jungle and took refuge with an all-female pack of African Wild Dogs. She became mates with the leader of the rivaling pack. Eventually it'd be known that their king is a lion. Whether or not it's Mohatu, Ahadi, Mufasa, Simba, or Kovu is beyond me xD I never decided.


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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 5:30 am 
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catwhohas14tails wrote:
I've managed to link Lion King with Balto. It wasn't easy, and I don't recommend it for everyone, even tho people already have.

Balto's great grand-daughter's master took a ship out there for studies I can't remember. She got separated from him in the jungle and took refuge with an all-female pack of African Wild Dogs. She became mates with the leader of the rivaling pack. Eventually it'd be known that their king is a lion. Whether or not it's Mohatu, Ahadi, Mufasa, Simba, or Kovu is beyond me xD I never decided.

Well, the way I see it, any use of descendants (or, though less likely in the specific kind of case you mention, ancestors) in a crossover of the milieus is one thing, and I would consider that a largely "all bets are off" kind of thing, because you're now not involving the specific characters which cannot plausibly be combined. This is a fundamentally different situation than, say, taking Balto over to Africa to have an adventure with Simba, or Kodi with Kovu, or something along those lines. :lol: Wouldn't you agree?

I mean, I am working on the outline for a story which would involve Balto, Aniu and Nava's descendants (and those of Nava's pack) to be combined with the setting of the Alpha and Omega movie, and its characters. But I certainly wouldn't take the Balto characters out there to Jasper Park. ROFL Wouldn't work. Not in the least.

Wolf_Bassist wrote:
On a more serious note, I have a question: What do you think about crossovers that take characters from one series and put them in another series in place of that series' characters, i.e. a re-telling of one story with different characters? I know of two examples on here that I'd like to cite. One of them being a re-telling of the first scene of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope featuring Balto characters in place of the well-known Star Wars characters, written by Starwarsisme.
http://www.animationsource.org/balto/en ... 50934.html

The second is my own venture into such a crossover: Balto: Le Mans, which is a modified re-telling of the 1971 Steve McQueen movie Le Mans, this one also featuring Balto characters in place of many of those from the real movie.
http://www.animationsource.org/balto/en ... 52176.html

I was afraid you were going to eventually get around to asking me about those. :lol: Eeesh. How do I respond here?

I have no problem with your writing skills, WB. And you have plenty of material which, on its own account, is good reading. However, these kinds of crossovers have never tickled my fancy. In fact, and I mean absolutely no disrespect or condescension here, but I really don't like the concepts in these stories. On the one hand, you're going beyond anthropomorphizing (which, the way I see it, is just giving animal characters the ability to think and communicate as humans do) to the level of stuff seen in the Disney Robin Hood movie, or its TaleSpin television series -- essentially, humans in animal suits. Never liked that much. Not as an adult. It's like how Hollywood took a great piece of literature (The Fantastic Mr. Fox) and turned it, essentially, into a furry dream movie. Ugh. And I DON'T like the humans-in-animal-suits concept. Not since even the great Charles Schulz turned Snoopy from a snarky, funny dog into a little man in a dog suit. Sure, he's just a comic strip character (where the kids often act and talk like adults for crying out loud), but he lost his "dog-ness" after that in my opinion.

The Balto Le Mans thing keeps reminding me of the Mario Kart games concept. Meh. And in my mind, that's not a good thing...in fact, it's rather silly (in my humble opinion). I respect that you love racing and the Balto movies. Believe me. No direct criticism of you or your work is intended, other than I cannot get behind it, and that I find the concept totally out of whack. It does nothing for me. And the Star Wars thing just the same. Although the furries must be loving the heck out of you. ROFL

I am glad that you write, and with such an apparent passion. I respect that. But these two stories (and anything like them) are really not my cup of tea and, with all due respect, not what I consider plausible crossovers (for the reasons Robert Reed stated in the memo I quoted).

Wolf_Bassist wrote:
Also, this is Part 1 of the special I mentioned in my previous post. This first part features the segment on the Masai and the dangers they face regarding nighttime animal attacks, including interviews from two real Masai villagers.
Afraid Of The Dark (Part 1 of 6)

I really do want to check this out, and will soon! Thanks for linking that!

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Last edited by BaltoSeppala on Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:06 pm 
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Excellent Topic, Do you think The Jungle Book and a Lion King crossover would work? I have also contemplated the idea of a Madagascar and Lion King crossover aswell.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 4:01 pm 
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Rush wrote:
Excellent Topic, Do you think The Jungle Book and a Lion King crossover would work? I have also contemplated the idea of a Madagascar and Lion King crossover aswell.

Well The Jungle Book takes place in the depths of the Indian back country and jungle, whereas The Lion King takes place out on the African savannah (probably central Africa). That is some distance between those two places. And in the case of the island nation of Madagascar (and the movie of the same name), which is at least much closer to Africa, you are still saddled with the same basic problem, and a rather wide and very deep channel of water between the island and the African continent.

You have to read this topic carefully, and then ask yourself the following question:


"Does it make sense that animals living in India (or Madagascar), and animals living in central Africa, could find themselves coming together? How? And why?"



Even in the fictional cartoon universes of those two (and many other) movies, one and one make two...one and one don't make one. Or, to paraphrase a cornball lawyer -- "if it doesn't fit, you must...quit". :lol: Unless it is some wild, fanciful series of universes you are combining...something on the order of science fiction or fantasy, then there are still basic principles of logic that you have to adhere to in order to be taken seriously by a thoughtful and intelligent reader, who is going to wonder why Baloo is pal-ling around with, say, Timon and Pumbaa [sp?], or those crazy penguins and the ring-tailed lemur are goofing around with the gang from The Lion King.

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 Post subject: Re: What makes a good crossover?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 4:42 pm 
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JerseyCaptain wrote:
Rush wrote:
Excellent Topic, Do you think The Jungle Book and a Lion King crossover would work? I have also contemplated the idea of a Madagascar and Lion King crossover aswell.

Well The Jungle Book takes place in the depths of the Indian back country and jungle, whereas The Lion King takes place out on the African savannah (probably central Africa). That is some distance between those two places. And in the case of the island nation of Madagascar (and the movie of the same name), which is at least much closer to Africa, you are still saddled with the same basic problem, and a rather wide and very deep channel of water between the island and the African continent.

You have to read this topic carefully, and then ask yourself the following question:


"Does it make sense that animals living in India (or Madagascar), and animals living in central Africa, could find themselves coming together? How? And why?"



Even in the fictional cartoon universes of those two (and many other) movies, one and one make two...one and one don't make one. Or, to paraphrase a cornball lawyer -- "if it doesn't fit, you must...quit". :lol: Unless it is some wild, fanciful series of universes you are combining...something on the order of science fiction or fantasy, then there are still basic principles of logic that you have to adhere to in order to be taken seriously by a thoughtful and intelligent reader, who is going to wonder why Baloo is pal-ling around with, say, Timon and Pumbaa [sp?], or those crazy penguins and the ring-tailed lemur are goofing around with the gang from The Lion King.


Well I was just thinking of instances that may bring the two together. Animals being harvested for zoos and such like attractions. But maybe that idea is a bit far fetched. I'm trying to think more though if Kovu and Sher khan would be placed around the same time as the years of the Gladiators. Two very unlikely to meet characters become possibly allies. But as I said that idea is far fetched.

Madagascar however is not. Sorry I forgot to mention that I was meaning to cross over Madagascar 2 with the Lion King which is much more likely since they crash land in Africa during that film.

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