The Iditarod

The Iditarod


Information about the Iditarod



I'm sure a lot of you may of heard of the Iditarod. Well if you haven't, it's a sled dog race that commemorates the 1925 serum run. The race is set over 1150 miles of some of the roughest terrain in the world. Mushers in the race face mountain ranges, frozen rivers, dense forest, desolate tundra and miles and miles of the windswept coast. During this race the temperature ranges between 0 degrees to below -40 degrees. This causes numerous hazards, which can make it incredibly dangerous for the dogs and mushers. The race Starts in Anchorage, in south central Alaska, to Nome on the western Bering Sea coast. Each team of 12 to 16 dogs and their musher cover over 1150 miles in 10 to 17 days.


The Race has been acclaimed the 'Last Great Race on Earth'. Every year German, Spanish, British, Japanese and American film crews have covered the event. Journalists from outdoor magazines, adventure magazines, newspapers and wire services flock to Anchorage and Nome to record the excitement. It’s not just a dog sled race, it’s a race in which unique men and woman compete. Mushers enter from all walks of life. Fishermen, lawyers, doctors, miners, artists, natives, Canadians, Swiss, French and others; men and women each with their own story, each with their own reasons for going the distance. It’s a race organized and run primarily by volunteers, thousands of volunteers, men and women, students and village residents. They man headquarters at Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Nome and Wasilla. They fly volunteers, veterinarians, dog food and supplies. They act as checkers, coordinators, and family supporters of each musher.


Race
The race puts man and animal against nature, against wild Alaska at her best and as each mile is covered, a tribute to Alaska’s past is issued. The Iditarod is a tie to — a commemoration of — that colorful past.


The Iditarod Trail, now a National Historic Trail, had its beginnings as a mail and supply route from the coastal towns of Seward and Knik to the interior mining camps at Flat, Ophir, Ruby and beyond to the west coast communities of Unalakleet, Elim, Golovin, White Mountain and Nome.


In 1925, part of the Iditarod Trail became a life saving highway for epidemic-stricken Nome. Diphtheria threatened and serum had to be brought in; again by intrepid dog mushers and their faithful hard-driving dogs.

 

Modified by a moderator on 9/25/16






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