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Production information?

Date : July 22, 2009

Category : Default / Other

Question :
Mmm, I'm going to add a lot of questions there, sorry by advance ;)

When did you exactly had the idea about the series? I have heard that almost all the settings and characters were created in only 3 days - can you confirm that?

How long were the pre-production and the production phases?

What was the budget of the series? (if it's not confidential)

I have read an interview to Ed Ghertner :

http://www.mouseclubhouse.com/ [...] rtner/ed-ghertner-talespin.htm

, who says that there were basically four teams working on Talespin! It seems a lot uncommon, why was it like this? Wasn't it a hell to supervise and coordinate everything in such situation?


Best answer :
I've answered some of this in my previous posting.

It's been a long time - and some of this is a blur - plus a lot of the budgeting/scheduling/pre-productioning is done by number-crunchers and execs in different departments. Mark and I were focused on getting the show up & running creatively. So I'm afraid I can't answer your "production" questions accurately. But basically from "OK" to Final Cut was a year-and-a-half of non-stop work.

Like I said, I don't know the budget for the show, but I think at one point we realized that we were spending the same per episode as Star Trek:The Next Generation was spending. They were a million dollars per 1 hour episode, and we were about a half million per half-hour Tale Spin.

I haven't read Ed's interview yet, but, yes, it's true - we had 4 teams. There were 4 story editors (each with a group of writers) linked to 4 director/producers (each with a group of designers, board artists, & colorists). Ed was a director/producer until he left to go work at Features (Lion King, I think).

Each writer/artist team was responsible for getting out 1 script every two weeks (two teams delivering in tandem). That meant (with 4 teams on a rotating basis) we were churning out 2 half hour shows each and every week. It was fun, but grueling. And since Mark & I were story editing our own teams, we were even MORE swamped cuz we had to look over ALL the scripts & storyboards that were being created. We did that for 65 episodes. Yes, "hell" is a good word choice.



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July 28, 2009
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If you think about footage (and not quality) we did the same about of footage as all the Disney animated features from Snow White to Jungle Book ... but in only a year & a half!
Jymn

July 23, 2009
Webmaster France Male Is not currently on the site
AS leader
A year and a half...Mmm...To produce 65 episodes, that's really short! (especially when compared to animated features, which most often spend 3-4 years into production) I understand better why there were 4 teams lol

But at least it worked the right way, because it bringed much creativity to the series (it's definitely one of the series I have seen which has the most varied episodes!), while staying coherent on the characters/universe - so yes, you all did a really good job considering the situation :)

July 23, 2009
Is not currently on the site
I've answered some of this in my previous posting.

It's been a long time - and some of this is a blur - plus a lot of the budgeting/scheduling/pre-productioning is done by number-crunchers and execs in different departments. Mark and I were focused on getting the show up & running creatively. So I'm afraid I can't answer your "production" questions accurately. But basically from "OK" to Final Cut was a year-and-a-half of non-stop work.

Like I said, I don't know the budget for the show, but I think at one point we realized that we were spending the same per episode as Star Trek:The Next Generation was spending. They were a million dollars per 1 hour episode, and we were about a half million per half-hour Tale Spin.

I haven't read Ed's interview yet, but, yes, it's true - we had 4 teams. There were 4 story editors (each with a group of writers) linked to 4 director/producers (each with a group of designers, board artists, & colorists). Ed was a director/producer until he left to go work at Features (Lion King, I think).

Each writer/artist team was responsible for getting out 1 script every two weeks (two teams delivering in tandem). That meant (with 4 teams on a rotating basis) we were churning out 2 half hour shows each and every week. It was fun, but grueling. And since Mark & I were story editing our own teams, we were even MORE swamped cuz we had to look over ALL the scripts & storyboards that were being created. We did that for 65 episodes. Yes, "hell" is a good word choice.



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July 23, 2009
usa Female Is not currently on the site




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